Boutique Fitness Studio

What is AIS?

The Active Isolated Stretching (AIS) technique was developed by Aaron Mattes over the last 4 decades. His technique provides assisted stretching of major muscle groups, this means the practicioner provides gentle pressure to aid in the stretch. It is effective because it is dynamic, not static. Static stretching can trigger the body's natural protective stretch reflex, and fights the stretch. Dynamic stretches provide greater benefit because the body doesn't see the stretch as a traumatic event, so it will relax and allow the muscle to lengthen. This will improve overall elasticity and blood circulation.                                                                                                               
This stretching method is active, meaning the client is working one muscle group to allow it'sopposing muscle group to relax and lengthen. The muscles are stretched in a particular order, as they are layered upon each other within the body. This order allows a deeper release of the next muscle. Each muscle group is worked at multiple angles to obtain maximum flexibility through the all the fibers in the muscle. Sometimes the protocol for a particular body part may need to be done more than once for the fullest benefit, basically, baby steps. Clients come away from a session feeling "worked" yet flexible.

For more information on AIS please see Aaron Mattes' website
http://www.stretchingusa.com/active-isolated-stretching

Author: Heather Mazeika

 

TRX 101

TRX 101

You’ve seen those black and yellow straps popping up everywhere these days. They’re hanging in your gym, at your physical therapist’s office, and now in your pilates studio. So the question is, what are these straps? How do you use them? And why are they everywhere? I’m here to answer those questions for you!

The TRX consists of two nylon straps fixed to a single anchor point with handles and foot-cradles at the end of each strap.  The straps can be attached to the ceiling, anchored to a wall, or even closed into a door. At less than two pounds, the straps can be carried anywhere for an on-the-go workout!

Now how do you use the TRX straps? Excellent question with SO many answers! There are hundreds of exercises you can perform on the TRX. Most resemble traditional exercises but either the individual’s hands or feet are attached to the TRX while the opposite end of the body is in contact with the ground. Think squats holding on to the TRX straps or push-ups with feet in the straps.

Why are TRX straps everywhere? Because they are an effective way to train the body for functional movement with a focus on the body’s core muscles. Functional movement consists of any movement we do during daily activity: squatting to get something out of a low cabinet, pulling a heavy door open, lifting an object on to a high shelf. Each of those movements requires strength and stability. The TRX uses bodyweight exercises to build strength, and the straps add a level of instability that trains the core to activate and control movement. 

TRX training sounds difficult, right? Yes, and no. The TRX is completely customizable. You can use the straps to make exercises tougher, but you can also use them to make modifications to exercises. For instance, squatting while holding on to the straps takes some pressure off of the legs as it allows the individual to help themselves back up with their arms as well as their legs, making a squat easier. On the other hand, putting feet into the straps and performing a push up increases the instability of the exercise and requires the core to activate more than a traditional push up.

Now that you know all about the TRX, come check out TRX Fusion at Niche Boutique Fitness Studio – Tuesdays at 6pm, Wednesdays at 9:30am, and Saturdays at 10:30am!